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How Will Alopecia Universalis Affect My Life?

Her Hair Loss Help has an outstanding Discussion Forum specifically for women with alopecia and other forms of hair lossThis is a common question, particularly for children, teens, and young adults who are beginning to form lifelong goals and who may live with the effects of alopecia universalis for many years. The comforting news is that alopecia universalis is not a painful disease and does not make people feel sick physically. It is not contagious, and people who have the disease are generally healthy otherwise. It does not reduce life expectancy and it should not interfere with the ability to achieve such life goals as going to school, working, marrying, raising a family, playing sports, and exercising.

The emotional aspects of living with hair loss, however, can be challenging. Many people cope by learning as much as they can about the disease; speaking with others who are facing the same problem; and, if necessary, seeking counseling to help build a positive self-image. HerHairLossHelp.com offers a wonderful Online Community of women who suffer from alopecia and other hair loss afflictions that can help women who suffer from hair loss cope with their everyday activities. Having a community of women, who are all going through various stages of hair loss, offers other women an empathetic person to turn to when dealing with emotional difficulties because of their hair loss. Visit the HerHairLossHelp.com Forum to learn more!

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Life doesn't end with alopecia - Many women are successful in combating the self esteem issues of not having hair

Angelica Galindez was diagnosed with alopecia when she was 12 years old. But now, seven years later, the 19-year-old from San Francisco is the picture of confidence. She proved that on Saturday when she ditched her wig to compete in the Miss Philippines Earth USA beauty pageant and took home one of six victory crowns.  Read more at Huffington Post

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Hair Loss in Women

Her Hair Loss Help has an outstanding Discussion Forum specifically for women with alopecia and other forms of hair lossWomen experience hair loss because of a number of reasons, such as pregnancy, stress, genetics or an illness. Another cause is Alopecia Areata, an autoimmune disorder which results in hair loss.

Women going through any type of hair loss becomes distraught about their changing appearance. Some are comfortable leading their life as someone without hair, but many seek out hair replacement studios to give them back what they have lost.

Unless you yourself have been through sudden and unexpected hair loss, it is nearly impossible to fully understand the emotions that a person must be experiencing. The process going from someone with hair, to someone losing their hair, to someone seeking hair replacement, is a sensitive and personal journey.

How Can I Cope With the Effects of Alopecia?

Living with hair loss can be hard, especially in a culture that views hair as a sign of youth and good health. Even so, most people with alopecia areata are well-adjusted, contented people living full lives.

The key to coping is valuing yourself for who you are, not for how much hair you have or don’t have. Many people learning to cope with alopecia universalis find it helpful to talk with other people who are dealing with the same problems. More than four million people nationwide have this disease at some point in their lives, so you are not alone. We have a number of women who live with alopecia universalis on a daily basis in our Online Community who can help through message boards and support groups. You can also find others with the disease, the National Alopecia Areata Foundation (NAAF) can help through its pen pal program, message boards, annual conference, and support groups that meet in various locations nationwide.

Wigs and hair extensions are available to help achieve a full head of hair even when you have lost all your hairAnother way to cope with the disease is to minimize its effects on your appearance. If you have total hair loss, a wig or hairpiece can look natural and stylish. For small patches of hair loss, a hair-colored powder, cream, or crayon applied to the scalp can make hair loss less obvious by eliminating the contrast between the hair and the scalp. Skillfully applied eyebrow pencil can mask missing eyebrows.

For women, attractive scarves can hide patchy hair loss; jewelry and clothing can distract attention from patchy hair; and proper makeup can camouflage the effects of lost facial hair. If you would like to learn more about camouflaging the cosmetic aspects of alopecia universalis, visit our online forum for information about your cosmetic options.

Information on Telogen Effluvium & Tips on How to Deal with Hair Loss

Her Hair Loss Help has an outstanding Discussion Forum specifically for women with telogen effluvium and other forms of hair lossTelogen effluvium (TE) is the second most common form of hair loss most dermatologists see. When a woman is actively shedding hair during an effluvium (meaning ‘outflow’), it can be exasperating, depressing, and scary.

Sometimes a TE shed, as our forum members frequently call their thinning hair loss, can last for months or even years. Occasionally, it will appear as if the shedding occurs along with your menstrual cycle (cyclical shedding). Women with TE never completely lose all their scalp hair, but the hair can be noticeably thin in severe cases. Whatever form of hair loss your telogen effluvium takes, it is fully reversible.

Things that can help minimize a telogen effluvium shed (or hair thinning):

  • Sometimes skipping a shampoo for a day will make it seem as though more hair comes out the next time you wash. Many of our forum members say it helps to shampoo your hair every day.
  • Use an apple cider vinegar hair rinse once per week.
  • Blot your hair dry with a towel instead of vigorously rubbing your hair.
  • Apply a light conditioning cream to your hair after towel drying to protect it from unnecessary breakage.

Things that can help boost volume and give the illusion of thick hair:

  • Visit a professional hair salon professional in your area and request a cut that will give your hair more bounce and move lightly (generally just below the chin and lightly touching the shoulders). Highlights and lowlights using foil can also give the illusion of thicker, fuller hair.
  • Use a gentle hair care product that has thickening properties. Some of our forum members’ favorites include: Tigi Bedhead Superstar Sulfate Free Thickening Line, WEN Lavender Conditioning Cleanser, WEN Sweet Almond Conditioning Cleanser, Aquage Sulfate Free Shampoos and Conditioners, and Aquage Thickening Style Gel.
  • Loosely piling your hair up on top of your head and then piecing random pieces of hair with a good hair texturizer makes thinning hair look healthy and thick.

Supplements
Supplements can be a controversial topic in matters of hair loss. Many women who have recovered from telogen effluvium agree that you should steer clear of unnecessary supplements unless you have had blood tests to diagnose any vitamin deficiencies that can contribute to your hair loss. For example, if you are iron deficient or anemic, you should take a doctor recommended amount of iron supplements. Iron deficiency is known to cause or aggravate hair loss.

It’s important to remember that one supplement that worked for one woman may not work for you. Our bodies are unique and unnecessary supplements and medicines may do more harm than good.

One Life: Gail Porter Laid Bare {video clip}

In this powerful clip from the BBC documentary “One Life: Gail Porter Laid Bare,” Gail prepares to meet Michelle Chapman.

Claire Taylor ~ NHS Choices Video

In this NHS Choices video, Claire Taylor, describes how she has coped with alopecia since age 11 and hasn’t let it stop her doing the things she loves. You rock, Claire!