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Hair Loss in Women

Her Hair Loss Help has an outstanding Discussion Forum specifically for women with alopecia and other forms of hair lossWomen experience hair loss because of a number of reasons, such as pregnancy, stress, genetics or an illness. Another cause is Alopecia Areata, an autoimmune disorder which results in hair loss.

Women going through any type of hair loss becomes distraught about their changing appearance. Some are comfortable leading their life as someone without hair, but many seek out hair replacement studios to give them back what they have lost.

Unless you yourself have been through sudden and unexpected hair loss, it is nearly impossible to fully understand the emotions that a person must be experiencing. The process going from someone with hair, to someone losing their hair, to someone seeking hair replacement, is a sensitive and personal journey.

I’m 32 and I’ve had 4 battles with Alopecia Areata.

Story from a woman who has battled alopecia areata resulting from severe trauma and/or stress:

I’m 32 and I’ve had 4 battles with Alopecia Areata. Every time something major happens I begin to start loosing a patch of hair. First, when I made a huge move across country and left all my family, a spot started. (pretty scary) since it was the first time. The second time, I was in some financial problems, and again it started. The second times, I had deaths in the family a few years apart, and again, the patches came up. It’s a horrible feeling to have a full head of hair, and then all the sudden a small little patch starts and you start praying that it stops or doesn’t get that big. Currently, I have two huge spots on the back of my head that barely have any fuzz at all. In fact, some of the grey hairs stayed, and the brown didn’t. Weird. I’m not on any medications since the other times it grew back fairly quickly (6-9 months), but I think I’m going to find something this time since their much bigger than before.

Thank you for sharing your story!

Who Is Most Likely To Get Alopecia Areata?

Alopecia areata affects an estimated four million Americans of both sexes and of all ages and ethnic backgrounds. It often begins in childhood.

If you have a close family member with the disease, your risk of developing it is slightly increased. If your family member lost his or her first patch of hair before age 30, the risk to other family members is greater. Overall, one in five people with the disease have a family member who has it as well.

What Is Alopecia?

Alopecia is considered to be an autoimmune disease, in which the immune system, which is designed to protect the body from foreign invaders such as viruses and bacteria, mistakenly attacks the hair follicles, the tiny cup-shaped structures from which hairs grow. This can lead to hair loss on the scalp and elsewhere.

In most cases, hair falls out in small, round patches about the size of a quarter. In many cases, the disease does not extend beyond a few bare patches. In some people, hair loss is more extensive. Although uncommon, the disease can progress to cause total loss of hair on the head (referred to as alopecia areata totalis) or complete loss of hair on the head, face, and body (alopecia areata universalis).

Alopecia can occur at any age and is not life threatening, however the psychological impact on the person experiencing alopecia can be incredible. Such an impact can affect the person’s social life and may lead to a higher risk of major depression and/or anxiety disorders.

Photo Image of Alopecia Barbae

Image photo of alopecia barbae (barbie)

Image photo of alopecia barbae (barbie)

Alopecia Areata Image Photo

Image photo of what a typical onset of alopecia areata looks like.

Image photo of what a typical onset of alopecia areata looks like.