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AGA

Photo trichogram findings in women with AGA

Phototrichogram findings in women with androgenetic alopecia.
Department of Dermatology, Sisli Etfal Research and Training Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Background/purpose: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) in women is characterized by diffuse thinning in the frontal and parietal areas of the scalp; preservation of the frontal hairline is norm. Hair over the occipital scalp is preserved. The purpose of this work was to investigate the findings of phototrichogram (PTG) of the affected and the spared areas in women with AGA and to compare them with those of healthy subjects.

Methods: Twenty-two controls and 60 untreated women with AGA (32 with Ludwig I, 28 with Ludwig II) were included in this study. Hair density, percentages of thin hair, and non-growing hair were estimated both on the midscalp and on the occiput by using PTG with digital camera attached to a dermoscope.

Results: In the control group, hair density was higher on the midscalp than the occiput. In AGA groups, hair density was lower on the midscalp than the occiput and percentages of thin hair and non-growing hair were higher on the midscalp than the occiput. These findings were more prominent in Ludwig II group. In the occiput there were findings mimicking the changes seen on the midscalp. These were less striking than those seen on the midscalp yet the difference between the control and Ludwig II group was statistically significant.

Conclusion: We concluded that the hair is not equally distributed on the scalp, the occiput may be affected in females with AGA and further studies are necessary to support these findings.

PMID: 17026665 [PubMed – in process]

Photo image of middle aged woman with AGA

Photo image of middle aged woman with female pattern baldness.  Courtesy of www.trichologists.org.uk

Photo image of middle aged woman with female pattern baldness. Courtesy of www.trichologists.org.uk

How can I cope with the effects of AGA?


Living with hair loss can be hard, especially in a culture that views hair as a sign of youth and good health. Even so, most people with alopecia areata are well-adjusted, contented people living full lives.

The key to coping is valuing yourself for who you are, not for how much hair you have or don’t have. Many people learning to cope with alopecia areata find it helpful to talk with other people who are dealing with the same problems. More than four million people nationwide have this disease at some point in their lives, so you are not alone. We have a number of women who live with alopecias of all kinds a daily basis in our Online Community who can help through message boards and support groups.

Another way to cope with the disease is to minimize its effects on your appearance. A wig or hairpiece can look natural and stylish. For small patches of hair loss, a hair-colored powder, cream, or crayon applied to the scalp can make hair loss less obvious by eliminating the contrast between the hair and the scalp. Skillfully applied eyebrow pencil can mask missing eyebrows.

For women, attractive scarves can hide patchy hair loss; jewelry and clothing can distract attention from patchy hair; and proper makeup can camouflage the effects of lost facial hair. If you would like to learn more about camouflaging the cosmetic aspects of androgenetic alopecia, ask your doctor or members of your local support group to recommend a cosmetologist who specializes in working with people whose appearance is affected by medical conditions.

How will androgenetic alopecia affect my life?

The comforting news is that androgenetic alopecia is not a painful disease and does not make people feel sick physically. It is not contagious, and people who have the disease are generally healthy otherwise. It does not reduce life expectancy and it should not interfere with the ability to achieve such life goals as going to school, working, marrying, raising a family, playing sports, and exercising.

The emotional aspects of living with hair loss, however, can be challenging. Many people cope by learning as much as they can about the disease; speaking with others who are facing the same problem; and, if necessary, seeking counseling to help build a positive self-image. HerHairLossHelp.com offers a wonderful Online Community of women who suffer from alopecia and other hair loss afflictions that can help women who suffer from hair loss cope with their everyday activities. Having a community of women, who are all going through various stages of hair loss, offers other women an empathetic person to turn to when dealing with emotional difficulties because of their hair loss. Visit the HerHairLossHelp.com Forum to learn more!

Who is most likely to get AGA?

Men and women should look at both sides of their family tree for relatives with hereditary hair loss. The condition can be inherited from their mother, their father, or from both parents.

In the United States, 30 million women—or one in four—experience hereditary hair loss. Less frequent causes for hair loss in women include stress, illness, medication, diet, and pregnancy. But 70 percent of women with thinning hair can attribute it to hereditary hair loss.

Race neither increases nor decreases a person’s likelihood of experiencing hereditary hair loss. Hereditary hair loss affects all ethnicities.