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January 20th, 2011:

Bald Girls Do Lunch: News Clip

Bald Girls Do Lunch on KSTU TV in Salt Lake City, Utah.

One Life: Gail Porter Laid Bare {video clip}

In this powerful clip from the BBC documentary “One Life: Gail Porter Laid Bare,” Gail prepares to meet Michelle Chapman.

Video of Cosmetic Application on female alopecian

A female alopecian named Chrissy has her eyelashes and eyebrows done by a professional makeup artist.

Claire Taylor ~ NHS Choices Video

In this NHS Choices video, Claire Taylor, describes how she has coped with alopecia since age 11 and hasn’t let it stop her doing the things she loves. You rock, Claire!

What Can I Expect Next?

The course of alopecia universalis is highly unpredictable, and the uncertainty of what will happen next is probably the most difficult and frustrating aspect of the disease. You may continue to lose hair, or your hair loss may stop. The hair you have lost may or may not grow back, and you may or may not continue to develop new bare patches.

Is My Hair Loss a Symptom of a Serious Disease?

Alopecia universalis is not a life-threatening disease. It does not cause any physical pain, and people with the condition are generally healthy otherwise. But for most people, a disease that unpredictably affects their appearance the way alopecia universalis does is a serious matter.

The effects of alopecia universalis are primarily socially and emotionally disturbing. In alopecia universalis, however, loss of eyelashes and eyebrows and hair in the nose and ears can make the person more vulnerable to dust, germs, and foreign particles entering the eyes, nose, and ears.

Alopecia universalis often occurs in people whose family members have other autoimmune diseases, such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, pernicious anemia, or Addison’s disease. People who have alopecia areata do not usually have other autoimmune diseases, but they do have a higher occurrence of thyroid disease, atopic eczema, nasal allergies, and asthma.