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January 22nd, 2009:

Lists of Medication That Cause, Can Exacerbate, or Can Possibly Cause Hair Loss in Women

I’ve compiled a new listing of medications that are either known to cause hair loss OR attribute to the immature (anagen or telogen) loss of hair… the list is EXTENSIVE so I made it into a .pdf file for easier reading/printing. I was (once again) surprised by a few of the new additions.

I did NOT include BCPs or HRT on this listing because I’m actively working on a separate listing for these. I’m also planning on putting together another listing of ADs that are hair or “non”hair friendly since that comes up often as well…

Hope this helps!!
melanie

 

Click the image to view the full PDF file.

Click the image to view the full PDF file.

Birth Control / Contraceptives and Hair Loss

BCPs contain a combination of estrogen and progestin. All BCPs now have one main source of estrogen — ethinyl estradiol. Ethinyl estradiol is a constant in the BCP equation but the part that changes is the progestin level. There are a number of different types of progestin and some of them are higher in androgenic value than others. I’ve compiled data from a number of different sources and come up with a handy chart that helps you identify which BCPs are high in androgens and which ones are lower. Remember that the higher the androgens, the more likely it will cause excessive hair loss, acne and hirsutism.

Click the image to view the full PDF file.

Click the image to view the full PDF file.

Photo trichogram findings in women with AGA

Phototrichogram findings in women with androgenetic alopecia.
Department of Dermatology, Sisli Etfal Research and Training Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Background/purpose: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) in women is characterized by diffuse thinning in the frontal and parietal areas of the scalp; preservation of the frontal hairline is norm. Hair over the occipital scalp is preserved. The purpose of this work was to investigate the findings of phototrichogram (PTG) of the affected and the spared areas in women with AGA and to compare them with those of healthy subjects.

Methods: Twenty-two controls and 60 untreated women with AGA (32 with Ludwig I, 28 with Ludwig II) were included in this study. Hair density, percentages of thin hair, and non-growing hair were estimated both on the midscalp and on the occiput by using PTG with digital camera attached to a dermoscope.

Results: In the control group, hair density was higher on the midscalp than the occiput. In AGA groups, hair density was lower on the midscalp than the occiput and percentages of thin hair and non-growing hair were higher on the midscalp than the occiput. These findings were more prominent in Ludwig II group. In the occiput there were findings mimicking the changes seen on the midscalp. These were less striking than those seen on the midscalp yet the difference between the control and Ludwig II group was statistically significant.

Conclusion: We concluded that the hair is not equally distributed on the scalp, the occiput may be affected in females with AGA and further studies are necessary to support these findings.

PMID: 17026665 [PubMed – in process]